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VIEWS AT THE SEAT OF WAR IN NEW ZEALAND. VILLAGE ON THE WAIKATO RIVER. WAIKATO HEADS. THE accompanying Illustrations are from photographs recently taken by Mr. A. E. Smith, in the Waikato district, seat of the war in New Zealand. The bush with which the Waikato Heads are covered, as shown in our Engraving, extends about twelve miles by the Waikato River, and in this bush the Maoris are gathered in force. At the back of the Engraving of the Waikato village and church is represented a portion of the Heads, which begin at the mouth of the river. The settler's house depicted in the other Illustration is situated by the side of the Heads, not a great distance from the Waikato church. The Gazette of Tuesday week contains a series of despatches, dated the 5th of October last, received by the Secretary of State for War from Lieutenant-General D. A. Cameron, C.B., commanding her Majesty's forces in New Zealand. They state that the forces occupied nearly the same position as at the date of the last despatch. The advance was delayed until the gun-boats and steamers were available. The enemy has, in the mean time, taken the opportunity of practising his favourite mode of warfare by forming marauding bands, plundering the scattered settlements in the bush, and murdering individuals. This, in such a country as New Zealand, it is impossible wholly to prevent. It has, however, led to several skirmishes, reflecting the highest credit on the officers and men engaged, who have invariably fought with great gallantry and intelligence; and in every instance, except the conflict at Cameron Town (where a small detachment was suddenly exposed, in a most unfavourable position, to the fire of overwhelming numbers), they inflicted a much severer loss on the enemy than they had themselves sustained. The officers in command, many of them young and most of them untried, have one and all merited approbation. The efforts to raise volunteers in this and the neighbouring colonies for general service during the war, on condition of obtaining grants of land, have been most successful. About one half of them are drilled and fit for service at the outposts, and the remainder are being rapidly trained. Several additional troops have arrived from Melbourne and Hobart Town. SETTLER’S HOUSE AT WAIKATO.